ACCLAIMED ‘POP’ ARTIST TO HAVE BEATLES ARTWORK ’YESTERDAY’ EXHIBTED AT THE ROYAL ACADEMY SUMMER EXHIBITION

ACCLAIMED ‘POP’ ARTIST TO HAVE BEATLES ARTWORK ’YESTERDAY’ EXHIBTED AT THE ROYAL ACADEMY SUMMER EXHIBITION

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MORGAN HOWELL, ACCLAIMED ‘POP’ ARTIST TO HAVE BEATLES ARTWORK ’YESTERDAY’ EXHIBTED AT THE ROYAL ACADEMY SUMMER EXHIBITION ALONGSIDE WORKS BY TRACEY EMIN, BANKSY, WOLFGANG TILMANS & DAVID HOCKNEY

Hugely acclaimed ‘pop’ artist Morgan Howell, best known for his extraordinary, giant, hand-painted 3-D facsimiles of classic paper sleeve 45s, is to have a very special Beatles piece exhibited at this year’s Royal Academy Summer Exhibition.

 

The 2018 Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, its 250th that has over 1300 pieces in it chosen by Grayson Perry and a committee of fellow Royal Academians opens to the public on Tuesday 12th June.

 

The piece of Morgan’s that has been selected is ‘Yesterday’ by The Beatles on the Capitol imprint. It is a hand painted 3D object on canvas and paper with a 27” vinyl disc measuring 82cm square in its bespoke box frame and has the catalogue #485.

 

‘Yesterday’ is in Room 5 at the Royal Academy and was hung by the eminent sculptor Prof. David Mach RA. All the pieces he has selected sit in relief off the wall in some way or are objects rather than traditional paintings or prints.

 

Morgan commented about the honour “Previously I was shortlisted and received display notices, but I have never made it to the wall. It seems fitting that I am now there with a piece inspired by the most covered song of all time which was #1 in the USA the day I was born”.

 

‘Yesterday’ was painted in 2015 and was on loan to Capitol Records and hung in their iconic Capitol Tower in L.A. before featuring in Morgan’s DTLA show in 2016 with five other Beatles pieces. It then came back to London where it also spent time on display at The Barbican.

 

The song is undoubtedly one of the best-known tunes of all time but was infamously never actually a single in the UK having been vetoed by the other band members, as it was a McCartney composition with strings by George Martin. It was however released in the US on the Capitol label and was number 1 hit for the band. Morgan consulted with the renowned Beatles historian Mark Lewisohn, about which piece to paint and take to Los Angeles to hang in the Capitol Tower and both concluded that Yesterday was the most fitting.

 

https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/summer-exhibition-2018

 

About Morgan Howell FRSA

 

Known for his giant, hand-painted 3-D facsimiles of classic paper sleeve 45s Morgan creates a one-off unique supersized painting of each single. The natural wear incurred by the treasured disc is duly rendered in paint, making for a desirable artwork and consciousness portal for vinyl junkie music heads everywhere. Howell’s attention to detail is fastidious, down to the authentically distressed and creased canvas that doubles as up-scaled paper sleeves and the tiny imperfections round the edges of the labels of the 27” vinyl records. He additionally offers prints and also takes commissions as long as the song hasn’t already been painted.

 

Howell’s original paintings are attracting a cult following amongst musicians and music industry moguls. His painting of David Bowie’s ‘The Jean Genie’ sits proudly on the wall at Sony Music, ‘Yesterday’ by The Beatles was displayed at the iconic Capitol Building in L.A. and famous owners include Ozzy Osbourne, Hans Zimmer, Neil Diamond, Lord Lloyd Webber, Don Letts, Jerry Dammers, Ian Brown of The Stone Roses, The Kinks Ray Davies, Elvis Costello, Blur’s Damon Albarn and Johnny Marr.

 

Examples of his work are a permanent feature of the Radio 2 Green Room alongside Elton John’s piano, and when the BBC interviewed The Rolling Stones in London’s Dorchester Hotel in the run up to their concerts at the 02 in November 2012, three of his supersize Rolling Stones singles formed the backdrop.

 

Howell’s passion has always been his art. In 2005, he was made a Fellow of the Royal Society of Art and in 2010, he was shortlisted and received display notices at The Royal Academy.

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